Posts tagged industrial ecology

Enterprise GreenWorks: A master-class for learning WITH green-focussed innovators and entrepreneurs [Playlist Channel]

Enterprise GreenWorks is a components of an applied research and teaching initiative aimed at drawing lessons FROM and WITH ‘exemplary green enterprise’. The focus of EGW is on for-profit and not-for loss small-medium enterprise (SMEs) in the Auckland and neighbouring regions of Aotearoa/New Zealand. SMEs are exceptionally challenged when it comes to becoming an environmentally-sustainable leader when compared with organisation with more than 100 employees (Collins, Lawrence, Roper, & Haar, 2010).

An exemplary green enterprise seeks to achieve a zero environmental impact or have a net positive (regenerative) impact on the environment. The international exemplar is Interface Flor with its Mission Zero pursuit of a zero environmental footprint by 2020.

One component of our ‘learning adventure’ is a series of “Reality TV” episodes, named Enterprise GreenWorks (EGW). Each episode of Enterprise GreenWorks provides a “master” from an exemplary green enterprise the opportunity to challenge the (participative) audience to “attack” an environmental opportunity or challenge the “master” faces for their enterprise (rather like “The Apprentice”). After thoughtful deliberation by the audience, the guest ‘master’ will then select which of the proposals for solution they find most attractive. A new venture team will then progress research and development of the proposal with the client/master.

The notion of “Lessons WITH” implies that all participants in the project learn from each other - whether business “master”, student, teacher, researcher, or consultant. Collectively, I term these participants “learning partners”. The lessons/programme episodes, captured in a variety of digital media, will be made widely available in as “open source” as possible, eg through the Apple iTunes University, Apple eBooks, YouTube, and a special-purpose eCommons porthole.

To assist my project, I seek your nomination or self-selection as an exemplary green enterprise. Anyone who wishes to sponsor or provide resources in cash or kind is equally welcome to offer their participation. The project is conducted through Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland.

An episode of Enterprise GreenWorks typically presents:

  • Introduction to the exemplary enterprise and guest “master”;
  • Presentation of the challenge/opportunity/provocation;
  • Interrogation of the master;
  • Small-team brainstorming and action planning for a pathway forward to solve the challenge;
  • Presentation of the proposed solution by teams;
  • Critique and selection of the most preferred proposed solution(s);
  • Reflection on the lessons learned from the EGW episode.

Following the three-hour as-live-to-air episode, the project team(s) continue to advance their solutions with the master company and/or target organisations for “lessons learned”. A process of “kaizen”/Continuous Improvement is applied to the ongoing evolution of the EGW production and format.

For an example of the reality TV format that informs the design of Enterprise GreenWorks, see this (pre-historic/pre-digital!) video produced in the 1990s by Peter Mellalieu and his students/learning partners.

Mellalieu, P. J. (1996). Enterprise MasterWorks: An exemplary project-based learning context for enterprise development and innovation [Video playlist]. Massey University, Palmerston North. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL27Aj98lQ6w5WaOqrNaKsk­svETNc92Bho

White paper: research agenda and rationale
Mellalieu, P. J., & Gunaratne, K. A. (2013, December 2). From recycling to regeneration: lessons WITH exemplary green enterprise: A research agenda. Innovation & chaos … in search of optimality. Retrieved from http://pogus.tumblr.com/post/68753786836/from-recycling-to-r­egeneration-lessons-with-exemplary

LinkedIn discussion thread:
Mellalieu, P. J. (2013, December 16). From recycling to regeneration: Lessons WITH exemplary green enterprise - Discussion. Retrieved December 16, 2013, from http://www.linkedin.com/groups/From-recycling-regeneration-L­essons-exemplary-105503.S.5818099735789064196?qid=a482b681-a­e3c-42b5-921f-266a721212d0&trk=groups_most_popular-0-b-ttl&g­oback=%2Egmp_105503

Reference

Collins, E., Lawrence, S., Roper, J., & Haar, J. (2010). Business sustainability practices during the recession: The Growing Sustainability Divide. Hamilton, NZ: Waikato Management School, University of Waikato. Retrieved from www.management.ac.nz/sustainabilitydivide

Mellalieu, P. J. (2011, July 1). Greening your business with Enterprise GreenWorks™. Innovation & chaos … in search of optimality. Retrieved June 30, 2011, from http://pogus.tumblr.com/post/7095918900/greening-your-business-with-enterprise-greenworks-tm

From recycling to regeneration: lessons WITH exemplary green enterprise: A research agenda

image

The students I experience at my institute of higher education are GROSSLY ignorant of the environmental challenges facing businesses, communities, cities, and nations. Reason (I suspect): most of my students are international or permanent resident students recently from developing countries such as India, China, or the Middle East. Let me establish a context: I teach students of business, in the particular disciplines of operations management, innovation, entrepreneurship, and strategy.

Furthermore, in my experience, most of my students believe that the key rationale for a business to adopt environmentally-sound practices is to reduce waste, thereby reducing cost and improving profit. Again, in my view, this is a very limited perspective of the options for and benefits from environmentally sustainable practice that could be pursued by an organisation.

Consequently, I have initiated the development of an applied research programme at my institute of technology focussed on exploring the following question:

How do we enhance the depth and impact of the best aspects of professional education for sustainable development (EfS) within the context of an institute of technology and its stakeholders?

In contrast to my experience of students from developing countries, I observe that New Zealand-born students are aware that environmental problems rank highly amongst challenges for both New Zealand and the world. Many NZ students agree that our country is not so “100 % Pure” as it could/should be (For instance, see Sackur, 2011; Oram, 2006). However, these young “New Zealanders” express their incapacity to take significant, practical action to influence businesses, policy-makers, and/or other agencies to take appropriate action.

In summary, nearly all of the students in my recent teaching experience lack the skills and confidence to make informed choices about consumption, professional leadership, and/or political action to influence their lives, communities, and/or employers towards an environmentally-sustainable future.

Nevertheless, recent surveys in NZ (Colmar Brunton 2012, 2013 forthcoming) demonstrate that the demand for appropriate environmentally-appropriate action from the suppliers of products and services is growing strongly. In February 2008, Unitec Institute of Technology conducted a survey of the training needs of businesses located in the Rosebank Business Precinct, Auckland (Frederick, & Chittock, 2008). The survey identified that 22 per cent of respondents wanted training in ‘greening the business’. However, since 2008, the world recession has focussed the attention of many businesses in Rosebank and elsewhere on responding to the more urgent issues of business survival. Nevertheless, more recent studies conducted in 2010 identified that, despite the recession, CERTAIN types of New Zealand companies continue to maintain and expand a diverse range of practices related to ‘greening the business’ (Collins, Lawrence, Roper, & Haar, 2010, 2011). Specifically, by 2010, 30 per cent of firms larger than 99 employees were using environmental criteria as part of the process for choosing suppliers. In contrast to those ‘greening’ practices of larger companies, most small companies have retreated from their earlier commitments to environmentally sustainable practices: a ‘sustainability divide’ is emerging between larger and small companies.

This year, the yet-to-be released Colmar Brunton market survey (2013) finds that the GenY demographic (born between 1980 - 2000) is becoming potent as a purchasing segment. The Gen Y segment is beginning its entry into the mass consumption stage of their life-cycle, buying houses and furnishings, for instance. According to Colmar Brunton, a significant proportion of GenY consumers both make decisions to purchase and make decisions of where to be employed based on verifiable, authentic, and transparent green criteria. Furthermore, a growing proportion of  this demographic is prepared to pay a higher price for products with proven ‘green’ credentials. 

In conclusion, there is an important - increasingly urgent - challenge for educators to learn how to empower their students as informed, competent, and confident change masters for environmentally-sustainable practice within their employment, families, and communities. There is a special challenge in assisting small-medium enterprise (with under 100 employees) to respond to the New Zealand and international ‘green waves’ of supply-chain and end-customer demand. I suspect that part of achieving this aim for my institute of technology is to identify best-practice lessons from ambitious and/or high achieving environmentally sustainable small-medium enterprise operating in New Zealand and overseas. In particular, we need to draw lessons from those enterprise that have moved beyond recycling and waste reduction to regeneration and restoration along the lines of multinational carpet manufacturer Interface with its “Mission Zero” ambition to have a zero environmental footprint by 2020 (Anderson & White, 2009, 2011). 

image

Source: http://www.interfacecutthefluff.com/mission-zero-challenge-sourcing-recycled-raw-material/ Note: I guess this data pertains to the period 1996 through 2010, for Interface Inc.

My ideal for this applied research programme will be to work WITH exemplary green enterprise, and teachers to move everyone from “good to great”. Everyone = our businesses, our students, our colleagues, our own institution and its suppliers. Accordingly, the provisional research questions and objectives for my research agenda are:

  1. How do we enhance the depth and impact of the best aspects of professional education for sustainable development (EfS) within the context of an institute of technology and its stakeholders?
  2. What is the extent to which local small-medium companies have adopted policies focussed on journeying towards net positive environmental impacts from their activities? (ie environmental restoration or regeneration)
  3. What are the best examples of teaching practice currently extant at Unitec that contribute towards enabling graduates to work with and/or create environmentally restorative enterprise? [especially small-medium enterprise]
  4. What lessons for professional practice and teaching can be drawn from local enterprise who have undertaken a journey towards being environmentally restorative in their processes? [especially for small-medium enterprise]

Within the context of Unitec institute of Technology and its stakeholders, the [provisional] research objectives are:

  1. Identify, describe, and evaluate the nature of exemplary small-medium companies that have adopted policies focussed on journeying towards net positive environmental impacts from their activities (ie environmental restoration or regeneration)
  2. Identify, describe, and evaluate the extant examples of Education for Sustainability (EfS) practice at Unitec that contribute towards enabling graduates to work with and/or create environmentally restorative enterprise [especially small-medium enterprise].
  3. Collaborate with exemplary small-medium enterprise to enhance the achievement of their enterprise and environmental objectives [drawing lessons for general professional practice therefrom].
  4. Collaborate with Educators for Sustainability to enhance and extend their ability to contribute towards enabling graduates to work with and/or create environmentally restorative enterprise [drawing lessons for general professional practice therefrom].
  5. Identify and pilot-test the application of lessons for professional practice and teaching that can be drawn from local enterprise who have undertaken a journey towards being environmentally restorative in their processes, products, and services.

The research approach I am proposing to adopt will be informed by Appreciative Inquiry (AI), Action Learning, Project-Based Learning, and Action Research.

If you would like to join this applied research journey, please let me know!

Research publication proposal

Mellalieu, P. J. (2014). From recycling to regeneration: lessons WITH exemplary green enterprise. In A proposal for a workshop presentation at 59th Annual Conference, Entrepreneurship and Sustainability. Dublin: International Council for Small Business (ICSB). Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/5894263/From_recycling_to_regeneration_lessons_WITH_exemplary_green_enterprise_Conference_Proposal

References

Anderson, R. C., & White, R. (2009). Confessions of a Radical Industrialist: Profits, People, Purpose - Doing Business by Respecting the Earth. St. Martin’s Press.


Anderson, R. C., & White, R. (2011). Business Lessons from a Radical Industrialist. St. Martin’s Griffin.


Collins, E., Lawrence, S., Roper, J., & Haar, J. (2010). Business sustainability practices during the recession: The Growing Sustainability Divide. Hamilton, NZ: Waikato Management School, University of Waikato. Retrieved from www.management.ac.nz/sustainabilitydivide

Collins, E., Lawrence, S., Roper, J., & Haar, J. (2011). Sustainability and the Role of the Management Accountant (Vol. 7). London: Chartered Institute of Management Accountants. Retrieved from http://www.nzica.com/Technical/~/media/NZICA/Docs/Resources%20and%20publications/Publications/Sustainability%20and%20the%20Role%20of%20the%20Management%20Accountant.ashx

Colmar Brunton. (2012). Better business, better world. Auckland. Retrieved from http://www.colmarbrunton.co.nz/images/BBBW_Report.pdf

Frederick, H., & Chittock, G. (2008). Human resource strategies for training and education in the Rosebank business precinct (p. pp. 75). Auckland, NZ: Unitec Institute of Technology. Retrieved from https://www.dropbox.com/s/odj7487gfps9utn/Frederick_Chittock_2008_Human%20resource%20strategies%20for%20training%20and%20education%20in%20the%20Rosebank%20business.pdf

Mellalieu, Peter J, & Gunaratne, K. A. (2012, July 27). Greening the Rosebank Business District: A mindmap for a research programme. Unitec New Zealand Centre for Innovation & Entrepreneurship, Unitec New Zealand. Retrieved from https://www.dropbox.com/s/afyslr49obkzeqw/Greening%20the%20business.pdf

Mellalieu, Peter John. (2009). Shifting frontiers, new priorities, creating pathways: elevating the case for tertiary education for sustainable development in New Zealand. In New Zealand Tertiary Education Summit 2009 (TES). Wellington, New Zealand: Bright*Star Conferences & Training Ltd. Retrieved from http://unitec.academia.edu/PeterMellalieu/Papers/1572396/Shifting_frontiers_new_priorities_creating_pathways_elevating_the_case_for_tertiary_education_for_sustainable_development_in_New_Zealand

Mellalieu, Peter John. (2011, May). Greening your business with Unitec. Roundabout - Newsletter of the Rosebank Business Association, (61), 7.

Mellalieu, P. J. (2011). The Rise and Fall of Education for Sustainability in New Zealand’s Tertiary Education Strategies: An Orchestrated Conspiracy of Ignorance? [Extended version - Under review]. Auckland, NZ: Unitec Institute of Technology. Retrieved from http://unitec.academia.edu/PeterMellalieu/Papers/1518839/The_Rise_and_Fall_of_Education_for_Sustainability_in_New_Zealands_Tertiary_Education_Strategies_An_Orchestrated_Conspiracy_of_Ignorance_Extended_version_

Mellalieu, P. J. (2011, July 1). Greening your business with Enterprise GreenWorks™. Innovation & chaos … in search of optimality. Retrieved June 30, 2011, from http://pogus.tumblr.com/post/7095918900/greening-your-business-with-enterprise-greenworks-tm

Ministry for the Environment. (2007). Sustainable Design at Formway Furniture (INFO 182). Ministry for the Environment. Retrieved from http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/sus-dev/case-study-sustainable-design-at-formway-furniture-feb07/

Oram, R. (2006). Trouble in paradise: 100% impure New Zealand. Auckland, NZ: Unitec Institute of Technology.
Sackur, S. (2011). Key grilled over NZ’s clean, green image. London: BBC World. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3yFiNk_Ufw&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Taylor, W., & Christensen, M. (2013). Power budget processes and environmental sustainability. Presented at the 2013 New Zealand Management Accounting Conference NZICA, Queenstown, NZ: New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants. Retrieved from https://www.nzica.com/sitecore/shell/Controls/Rich%20Text%20Editor/~/media/NZICA/Docs/Students/Tertiary/Conference%20Papers%202013/Wendy%20Taylor%20NZMAC%20Power%20budget%20processes%20and%20environmental%20sustainability.ashx

TechNZ. (n.d.). Formway Furniture: Leaders in design. TechNZ - Foundation for Research, Science & Technology. Retrieved from http://www.37ds.com/myfiles/Manufacturing_Formway.pdf

Infographic: How China can drive a new clean industrial revolution
Related articles
Cloud Computing: the 4th IT Industrial Revolution! (zdnet.com)
How to teach… the industrial revolution (guardian.co.uk)
Makers: The New Industrial Revolution (adafruit.com)
Perpetuating the myth of the ‘industrial revolution’, or, O God, it’s not the Olympics again … (stalinsmoustache.wordpress.com)
The Machine, Designing a New Industrial Revolution (mocoloco.com)
Robotics Professor Warns Drones Will “Lead To A Sanitised Factory Of Slaughter” (dprogram.net)
Hoisted from the Archives (1998): Review of David S. Landes: “The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Are Some So Rich and Others So Poor?” (delong.typepad.com)
From Bits to Atoms: Co-Creating the Third Industrial Revolution (bigthink.com)
3D Printing Survey Hints to the Third Industrial Revolution (adafruit.com)

Introduction to industrial ecology

Greening your business with Enterprise GreenWorks™

Change in New Zealands sectoral greenhouse ga...

Change in New Zealand sectoral greenhouse gas emissions 1990 − 2007. Image via Wikipedia

Unitec students and staff have embarked on an innovative programme focussed on helping medium and small enterprise owners advance their journey towards ‘greening the business’. Every two weeks from August, business owners from Rosebank Business Association are invited to participate in an Enterprise GreenWorks™  (EGW) session focussed exclusively on developing promising pathways to guide a ‘guest’ business towards environmentally sustainable business processes and products. During the half-day Enterprise GreenWorks session, a new venture project team is established involving staff from the business and members from Unitec. Think of the reality TV show ‘The Apprentice’ adapted so that no one gets fired, but the earth gets saved … and a better profit is made compared with ‘business-as-usual’!


Source: Frederick & Chittock, 2008.

Several years ago a Unitec survey of Rosebank Business Association (RBA) members established that 22 per cent of respondents sought education and training support for ‘greening the business’ (Frederick & Chittock, 2008). A more recent national survey has found that despite the economic downturn certain types of businesses have continued to deepen their deployment of green business practices. For example, between 2003 and 2010 medium and especially larger companies have doubled their focus on being more selective about their suppliers (Collins et al, 2010). Despite the recession, this trend has continued to strengthen since 2006 so that by 2010 more than 30 per cent of firms larger than 99 employees use environmental criteria as part of their selection of suppliers.

Source: Collins et al, 2010

However, in contrast to these ‘greening’ trends, most small businesses have retreated from their earlier commitments to environmentally sustainable business practices. Also, their practices are typically very narrowly limited to recycling and environmental impact analysis. Professor Collins and her colleagues at Waikato Management School argue that a ‘sustainability divide’ is now growing between between most small businesses (less than 10 employees) and other businesses that have recognised the value and strategic imperative for ‘greening their business’.


Source: Collins et al, 2010.

Since 2008, teachers at Unitec Institute of Technology have begun to respond to Rosebank business’ call for graduates who understand that ‘greening the business’ is much more than reducing waste and recycling. For example, students in Unitec introductory business course BSNS 5391 Innovation and Entrepreneurship learn from New Zealand and world-class examples of eco-innovation and eco-enterprise.

In a recent class exercise, students learned how a three-year systematic programme of design-led ‘cradle-to-cradle’ thinking applied in Wellington-based Formway Furniture lead to the creation of the Life office chair. The chair has gained remarkable success in world markets for its innovative functional features and green credentials. Amongst its many new-to-market features, the Life Chair was constructed from both recycled and natural materials and designed for ease of refurbishing in the event of an office interior decor redesign. Licensed to Knoll, a leading US furniture company, the Life chair has generated sales of $500 million (Macfie, 2011; McClaren, 2008; Ministry for the Environment, 2007).

In early May this year, Unitec business students interviewed Robb Donzé, Managing Director for InteraceNZ, the New Zealand distributor for modular carpet tile systems manufactured by US-based multinational Interface Global. Under the helm of industrial engineer and founding entrepreneur Ray Anderson, Interface has achieved ‘legendary’ status in terms of its ingenious innovations in environmental practice and products. Remarkably, the company began as a typical 20th century industrial manufacturing company with no special interest in taking care of the natural environment apart from complying with environmental legislation. In the words of Ray Anderson, the company is on a mission to climb ‘Mount Sustainability’ achieving a zero ecological footprint by 2020. Coincidentally, the Unitec students saw practical proof of this type of product in their new student common room in the business studies building.

Green thinking in the business curriculum at Unitec is regarded increasingly as a core component, rather than something ‘added on’ as an optional extra. Developing from their studies in the introductory Innovation and Entrepreneurship course, final year studies require each student to examine critically the competitive strategies of a business to assess the risks and opportunities faced from market, technological, legal, and other factors including emerging green issues. Students then proceed to develop risk mitigation and/or opportunity development strategies for the business within the overall context of its competitive position and strategic ambitions. Rosebank businesses are especially welcome to invite Unitec students to engage in this student project work.

Unitec industrial technologist Peter Mellalieu notes that “Our students enter our courses expecting that ‘greening the business’ is hard work and reduces profit. Through exposure to real business examples, my students are surprised and delighted that there are both new start-up and long-established companies using ‘green thinking’ as a core process for stimulating creativity. The creative thinking inspired by ‘green thinking’ leads to win-win outcomes for the business and the environment. The new Enterprise GreenWorks program integrates these - and other Unitec green initiatives - in an exciting learning adventure beneficial to Rosebank Business Association members and their future employees and entrepreneurs from Unitec”.

Example of an Enterprise GreenWorks episode (Video: Massey University, 1997)

Enterprise GreenWorks™ is a trade mark of MyndSurfers Ltd.

An abridged version first published as:
Mellalieu, P. J. (2011, May). Greening your business with Unitec. Roundabout - Newsletter of the Rosebank Business Association, (61), 7.

Further reading
Anderson, R. C., & White, R. (2011). Business Lessons from a Radical Industrialist. St. Martin’s Griffin.

Collins, E., Lawrence, S., Roper, J., & Haar, J. (2010). Business sustainability practices during the recession: The Growing Sustainability Divide. Hamilton, NZ: Waikato Management School, University of Waikato. Retrieved from http://www.management.ac.nz/sustainabilitydivide


Elements of an Enterprise MasterWorks (EMW) learning adventure. (1997). . Palmerston North, NZ: Massey University Television Production Centre. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYya4gfcxs4&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Enterprise GreenWorks - 2011-1 Part 1: Overture and Interview [video]. (2011). . Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NiB20ERj9c&feature=youtube_gdata_player

Frederick, H., & Chittock, G. (2008). Human resource strategies for training and education in the Rosebank business precinct. Auckland, NZ: Unitec Institute of Technology.

McLaren, J. (2008). Life Cycle Management - Sustainability and society bridging piece [Case study of Formway Furniture]. Wellington, New Zealand: Landcare Research. Retrieved from http://www.landcareresearch.co.nz/publications/researchpubs/LCM_Briefing.pdf#search=%22mclaren%22


Mellalieu, P. J. (2011a, May 7). The Master’s Challenge: Ecotec’s “Green Op” fund. Innovation & chaos … in search of optimality. Retrieved April 7, 2011, from http://pogus.tumblr.com/post/4411593536/the-masters-challenge-ecotecs-green-op-fund


Mellalieu, P. J. (2011b, April 7). Enterprise GreenWorks - 2011-1 Part 1: Overture and Interview. Innovation & chaos … in search of optimality. Retrieved April 7, 2011, from http://pogus.tumblr.com/post/4411050625/enterprise-greenworks-2011-1-part-1-overture


Ministry for the Environment. (2007). Sustainable Design at Formway Furniture (INFO 182). Ministry for the Environment. Retrieved from http://www.mfe.govt.nz/publications/sus-dev/case-study-sustainable-design-at-formway-furniture-feb07/


Enhanced by Zemanta

The eco-industrial revolution: Peter Senge's system perspective (Interpreting Mellalieu's Kekule dream Part 7)

As I continue to reflect on ‘Mellalieu’s Kekule dream’ I have revisited some slides I was preparing for a presentation to my students of Unitec BSNS Innovation & Entrepreneurship. I never quite finished the presentation, and came up with something else … a prototype launch of Enterprise GreenWorks.

However, the slide sequence here integrates several strands of learning and teaching I’ve been engaged upon over the last six months (Maani & Cavana, 2007; Mann, 2011). Currently, I am  reading the vivid example of Interface Flooring’s climb up ‘Mount Sustainability’ (Anderson, & White, 2009). All these strands of learning are building a stronger sense of my destiny in teaching others how to use systems thinking and decision support to design and implement industrial ecology approaches to ‘greening the business’.

Source reference for the images

Senge, P. M., Smith, B., Schley, S., Laur, J., & Kruschwitz, N. (2008). The Necessary Revolution: How Individuals And Organizations Are Working Together to Create a Sustainable World (1st ed.). Doubleday Publishing.

Bibliography
Anderson, R. C., & White, R. (2009). Confessions of a Radical Industrialist: Profits, People, Purpose - Doing Business by Respecting the Earth. St. Martin’s Press.

Maani, K., & Cavana, R. (2007). Systems Thinking, System Dynamics: Managing Change and Complexity. Auckland, NZ: Pearson Education New Zealand. Retrieved from http://www.sys-think.com/books.asp

Mann, Samuel. (2011). The Green Graduate: Educating Every Student as a Sustainable Practitioner. Wellington, NZ: NZCER. Retrieved from http://www.nzcer.org.nz/default.php?products_id=2774

Further reading
Mann, Samuel. (n.d.). Mellalieu persistently and interminably asks the question - Computing for Sustainability. Retrieved May 4, 2009, from http://computingforsustainability.wordpress.com/2009/05/04/mellalieu-persistently-and-interminably-asks-the-question/#comment-1249

My manifesto

Mellalieu, P. J. (2009). Shifting frontiers, new priorities, creating pathways: elevating the case for tertiary education for sustainable development in New Zealand. New Zealand Tertiary Education Summit 2009 (TES). Presented at the New Zealand Tertiary Education Summit 2009, Wellington, New Zealand: Bright*Star Conferences & Training Ltd. Retrieved from http://preview.tinyurl.com/tes2009

Enhanced by Zemanta

Mellalieu’s Kekule dream episode 2: next steps

Ecological analysis of CO 2 in an ecosystem
Image via Wikipedia

I certainly find my dream is a ‘galvanic’ call to action. To create a long- lived organization like IBM or Apple … Or even St Peter’ church!

These options suggest themselves to me:

  • Grow Enterprise GreenWorks. Next step: publish launch article. Create Art of the Start (Kawasaki) plan and pitch
  • Recreate a faculty of business so that industrial ecology is the key leitmotiv driving its recreation. Begin application for a Dean’s position. Consult with prospective mentor. Next step: use Mann’s book as the Bible for the strategy. Tidy up my online presence.
  • Create a resource ‘bible’ (book, library) for teachers of applied industrial ecology that compliments/applies the experience of Samuel Mann especially for the teaching of business, innovation, and entrepreneurship.

Next steps

  • Re-blog to trumblr previous references my students and I have made to Kekule’s dream - DONE!
  • Post Peter Senge's industrial metabolism model on tumblr, and my wall.
  • Book review Mann’s book, from the perspective of the above smorgasbord of options.
  • Take a walk whilst this warm winter’s day continues (a sunny 19 C here in Waitakere, New Zealand - and it’s nearly mid-winter! Roll on global warming!!!! :)
  • Finish and send draft request to my mentor
  • Get ready to FOCUS!

On starting and preparing a Kawasakian pitch

Kawasaki, G. (2004a). The art of the start: the time-tested, battle-hardened guide for anyone starting anything. Portfolio.

Kawasaki, G. (2004b). The art of starting. The art of the start: the time-tested, battle-hardened guide for anyone starting anything (pp. 3-26). Portfolio.

Kawasaki, G. (n.d.). Art of the Start - website. Retrieved September 30, 2009, from http://www.guykawasaki.com/books/art-of-the-start.shtml

The Art of the Start. (2006). . Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3xaeVXTSBg&feature=youtube_gdata

Applied Industrial metabolism

Anderson, R. C., & White, R. (2009). Confessions of a Radical Industrialist: Profits, People, Purpose - Doing Business by Respecting the Earth. St. Martin’s Press. [ nearly finished reading. Inspirational]

Bourg, D., Erkman, S., & Chirac, J. (2003). Perspectives on Industrial Ecology. Greenleaf Pubns.

Braungart, M. (2002). Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things (1st ed.). North Point Press. [finished reading ages ago]

Cover of
Cover via Amazon

Chertow, M. R. (2000). Industrial Symbiosis: Literature and Taxonomy. Annual Review of Energy and the Environment, 25(1), 313-337. doi:10.1146/annurev.energy.25.1.313

Mann, S. (2011). The green graduate: Educating every student as a sustainable practitioner. Wellington, NZ: NZCER. [started reading]

Senge, P. M., Smith, B., Schley, S., Laur, J., & Kruschwitz, N. (2008). The Necessary Revolution: How Individuals And Organizations Are Working Together to Create a Sustainable World (1st ed.). Doubleday Publishing. [Partly read]

NZCEE: What is Ecological Economics? (n.d.). New Zealand Centre for Ecological Economics. Retrieved January 24, 2011, from http://nzcee.massey.ac.nz/about_nzcee/whatis.html

Enhanced by Zemanta