Posts tagged mind

IBM: 1100100 and counting. (2011, June 9).
The Economist. Retrieved June 16, 2011, from http://www.economist.com/node/18803123
THE long passage that connects the two wings of IBM’s headquarters in  Armonk gives a new meaning to the expression “a walk down memory lane”.  From punch cards to magnetic tapes and disk drives to memory chips,  every means of storing information since the advent of modern  calculating machines is on display, either as an exhibit or as a photo.  Other relics of computing can be found in the building, an hour’s drive  north of New York City. Near the boardroom sits a desk-sized calculator  with hundreds of knobs. Visitors can also wonder about a tangle of wires  connected to a metal plate—an early form of software called a “control  panel”.
My first contact with IBM
Mellalieu, P. J. (1972). August Holiday Programme [in Electronic Data Processing at IBM Auckland]. In J. Cogswell (Ed.), Cambridge High School Magazine - CHS 1972 (p. 16). Cambridge High School. Retrieved from http://pogus.tumblr.com/post/3304735044/during-the-august-holidays-i-rested-myself-from
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IBM: 1100100 and counting. (2011, June 9).

The Economist. Retrieved June 16, 2011, from http://www.economist.com/node/18803123

THE long passage that connects the two wings of IBM’s headquarters in Armonk gives a new meaning to the expression “a walk down memory lane”. From punch cards to magnetic tapes and disk drives to memory chips, every means of storing information since the advent of modern calculating machines is on display, either as an exhibit or as a photo. Other relics of computing can be found in the building, an hour’s drive north of New York City. Near the boardroom sits a desk-sized calculator with hundreds of knobs. Visitors can also wonder about a tangle of wires connected to a metal plate—an early form of software called a “control panel”.

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The goals of shamatha practice [Sanskrit: meditative quiescence] are to quiet the noise that bedevils the untrained mind, in which one’s focus darts from one sight or sound or thought to another like a dragonfly, and replace it with attentional stability and clarity. Those two qualities of attention … allow the practitioner to gain insight into the nature of mind and human experience.

To do this, yogis cultivate a sense of mental and physical relaxation from which attentional stability follows. That enables the mind to focus either on an object in the outside world or on a thought or feeling generated within the mind, something that in a person less practiced in attentional training tends to vanish like surf on the sand.

A mind trained in shamantha is better able to resist distraction and feels a sense of peace and calm. Attentional clarity, which follows from attentional stability, is the ability to focus on a chosen object with vividness and in sharp detail, no longer dulled by the boredom or mental fidgets typical of the untrained mind.

Tools for the mind: Sinclair Scientific calculator
My friend Al brought his Sinclair for me to test. A set of new batteries and the device glowed away.
"An ingenious aspect of the design which showed Sinclair’s inventiveness  was that the machine made use of what was originally a 4-function  calculator chip. Sinclair realised that by using RPN and allowing a reduced precision  of 4 or 5 significant figures displayed in scientific notation, the  algorithms for scientific functions could be redesigned and compacted to  fit in the same programmable space on the chip. This allowed Sinclair  to adapt the relatively low-cost processor and produce an ‘electronic  slide rule’ that fitted easily in a shirt pocket, at a price that even  impecunious students could afford.”
My Sinclair Oxford 300 replaced my slide rule in 1975.
Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinclair_Scientific

Tools for the mind: Sinclair Scientific calculator

My friend Al brought his Sinclair for me to test. A set of new batteries and the device glowed away.

"An ingenious aspect of the design which showed Sinclair’s inventiveness was that the machine made use of what was originally a 4-function calculator chip. Sinclair realised that by using RPN and allowing a reduced precision of 4 or 5 significant figures displayed in scientific notation, the algorithms for scientific functions could be redesigned and compacted to fit in the same programmable space on the chip. This allowed Sinclair to adapt the relatively low-cost processor and produce an ‘electronic slide rule’ that fitted easily in a shirt pocket, at a price that even impecunious students could afford.”

My Sinclair Oxford 300 replaced my slide rule in 1975.Sinclair Oxford 300

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinclair_Scientific